1.    Why do I need to work with an agency?

An agency can assist you with your needs during  pregnancy. We can provide counseling, assist you in choosing a family for your baby,  take care of legal work, and assist with medical expenses if needed.

2.    Can I choose a family for my baby?

Yes! You can choose the family for your baby  by selecting from parents screened by Adoption Associates, Inc.

3.    How can I be sure that my child will not be abused or neglected?

Adoptive families approved by Adoption Associates, Inc. must meet the standards of being a stable family, having  excellent personal  references, employment verification, health and medical forms, and approved clearances by the State Police and Michigan Protective Services. If your adoption includes the exchange of photos and letters, you will see for yourself how well cared for and loved your child is.

4.    How soon after birth will my baby go to the adoptive parents I choose?

This will depend on your choice, the legal aspects of the adoption, and the cooperation of the birth father.  Many birth mothers want their baby  placed with the family by the time they leave the hospital. The agency can also provide temporary care, if needed, with a host family.

5.    How do I know my baby will be well cared for if I choose host family care?

Adoption Associates, Inc. has several selected families who provide excellent pre-adoptive host family care. These families have been working with us for a long time and are loving, caring homes. We can share photos and information about them if you are interested.

6.    Will I be able to see my baby in the hospital?

Yes. Your caseworker will work with you to make a well thought-out hospital plan. You will have the opportunity to decide ahead of time about the amount of contact you would like with your baby.

7.    What kind of contact can I have with my baby after the adoption?

In most  cases, you can choose an adoption that allows for ongoing updates, through letters and photos arranged through the agency, for up to 18 years. Some adoptions include visits. It is up to you to decide the level of openness in your adoption. Adoptive Families respect and understand your need to know that your child is well cared for.

8.    Is adoption permanent?

Yes. After you sign a release of parental rights, the child will legally become a permanent member of the adoptive family.

9.    Does the birth father have any rights?

The birth father’s rights must also be considered when planning adoption.If he disagrees with adoption, we will work with the court to determine if his rights can be terminated.

10.  What if I can’t locate the birth father?

You will need to provide us with any information that you have regarding the birth father and we will attempt to locate him.

11. What kind of information will my child know about me?

We encourage you to pass on medical information and social history to your child. You may also send photos and letters to the family through the agency or as arranged. You may want to write a letter to your child sharing special information about yourself or send a gift that will tell your child in the future that your decision for adoption was based on love and wanting the best for their future.

12. Can my child fine me in the future?

According to Michigan law, at the time a child turns 18, unless you have filled out a form to deny information shared through the Central Registry, the child may have access to identifying information about you. If future contact is acceptable to you, all you need to do is keep your address current with the Central Registry or our agency.

13. Can you help me with medical costs?

Many young women are eligible for medical insurance or public assistance, and we can assist you in determining if you qualify. If you are not covered by Medicaid, we can help you with medical expenses.

14. Do I need an attorney or do I have to pay any fees?

You do not need an attorney and there are no costs to you. We will handle all of the necessary legal details on your behalf.

15. Is Adoption a selfish decision?

Adoption is a loving decision based entirely on the best interest of the child. Adoptive parents are prepared in every way to provide for your child and it could actually be the most caring, selfless decision you ever make.

16. I think I may be pregnant unexpectedly. How can I find out for sure whether I’m pregnant?

You can usually find a Pregnancy Center in your area who can provide you with a FREE pregnancy test and will talk with you about your options. Look under the Resources tab on this web page and search for a pregnancy center by your zip code.

17. Can I be involved in choosing the family for my baby?

Yes! Birth parents are definitely involved in selecting the prospective adoptive parents. We have many waiting families already approved for adoption. You can find profiles on our web page under Waiting Families or talk with a caseworker about how you can select an adoptive family.

18. How much contact can I have with the family after the birth?

The amount of contact that you have with the family is up to you and we will help you find the family that is right for you. During your pregnancy, you will be able to talk with a caseworker about openness and select an adoptive family who meets your expectations. Most adoptions include at least meeting the adoptive family during your pregnancy, getting to know the adoptive family and receiving pictures/letters over the years. You can also choose a fully open adoption which will include personal visits with the family and child.

19. Why do expectant mothers choose adoption?

Birth mothers choose adoption when they find themselves pregnant at a time when they are not prepared to take on the responsibility of caring for another child at this time. They are seeking parents who can provide their child with a permanent and stabile home, and a bright future. Birth parents care very much about their child and are seeking a plan in the best interest of the child.

20. How will I know that my baby is with a good family?

Families who want to adopt must go through a stringent screening process to show that they are a stable family, in good health, people of good moral character, financially and emotionally secure and ready to be parents. Birth parents can have an open adoption which includes receiving pictures and letters from the family for reassurance that your child is in a good home and has a good future.

21. What about my medical bills and other expenses?

Financial assistance can be available to help you with pregnancy related expenses during your pregnancy and for up to six weeks after delivery. You can talk to a caseworker to learn more details about how this works.

22. What if I need housing?

We can assist you with resources for housing if needed.

23. If I choose adoption is my decision final?

Your decision for adoption is final after you voluntarily release your parental rights. This usually occurs 2-6 weeks after your baby is born.

24. What will my child be told about me and the adoption?

Your child will know the story of his adoption because adoptive parents understand how important ti is to educate children about adoption from a very early age. Most adoptive parents have the opportunity to meet birth parents and can learn about you and your choice for adoption so that they can provide accurate information directly to their child. You will be able to provide information about yourself to the agency, to share with the family and can send pictures and letters to them to share as the child grows up.

25. How involved does the biological father have to be and what are his rights?

Some birth fathers are very involved and supportive in an adoption plan, and can be as much a part of the adoption as you would like him to be. If he is not an involved party, he can sign legal paperwork indicating that he is not asking for custody or he has a right to be notified of the hearing. We will work with you to determine his level of involvement and cooperation and the best way to handle the legal situation with the birth father.

26. What are my rights?

As a parent, you have a right to custody and visitation of your baby. If you release your rights so that the child can be adopted, your parental rights, including custody and visitation as well as all parental rights, are terminated by the court so that the child can be permanently adopted by the family that you have selected. After termination of parental rights, you have 21 days to request a rehearing or file an appeal. This is not a time to change your mind, but has to do with the legal process and parental rights are rarely reinstated during the appeal period.